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Carl Heflin
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The Evolution of Robert Palmer: How His Music Changed from 1974 to 2003



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Robert Palmer Discography 19742003



Robert Palmer Discography 1974-2003: A Complete Guide to His Albums and Songs




Robert Palmer was one of the most versatile and influential singers and songwriters of his generation. He had a distinctive voice that could range from soulful to gritty, and a musical style that blended rock, pop, soul, funk, jazz, blues, reggae, and more. He was also known for his elegant and sophisticated image, and his iconic music videos that featured him surrounded by glamorous women.


From 1974 to 2003, Robert Palmer released 14 studio albums, three live albums, and 12 compilation albums. He also collaborated with other artists and groups, such as Vinegar Joe, the Power Station, UB40, and Duran Duran. He had many hit singles, such as "Addicted to Love", "Simply Irresistible", "Bad Case of Loving You (Doctor, Doctor)", "I Didn't Mean to Turn You On", "Every Kinda People", "Johnny and Mary", and "Some Guys Have All the Luck". He won two Grammy Awards for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance and an MTV Video Music Award for Best Male Video. He was also nominated for a Brit Award for Best British Male Solo Artist.


In this article, we will explore Robert Palmer's discography from 1974 to 2003, and highlight some of his best albums and songs. We will also look at his musical influences, his collaborations, his legacy, and his untimely death.


Robert Palmer's Early Albums: 1974-1979




Robert Palmer's solo career began in 1974, when he signed with Island Records and released his debut album Sneakin' Sally Through the Alley. The album was recorded in New Orleans with the backing band of the Meters and producer/guitarist Lowell George of Little Feat. The album was heavily influenced by the music of Little Feat and the funk fusion of the Meters. It featured songs such as "Sneakin' Sally Through the Alley", "Sailing Shoes", "Hey Julia", and "How Much Fun". The album received positive reviews from critics and reached number 107 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


In 1975, Palmer released his second album Pressure Drop, which continued his exploration of New Orleans funk and soul music. The album featured songs such as "Give Me an Inch", "Work to Make It Work", "Trouble", and "Here with You Tonight". The album also included a cover of Toots and the Maytals' reggae classic "Pressure Drop". The album received mixed reviews from critics and reached number 136 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


In 1976, Palmer released his third album Some People Can Do What They Like, which marked a departure from his previous albums. The album was recorded in Los Angeles with a different backing band that included members of Little Feat and Steely Dan. The album showcased Palmer's versatility as a singer and songwriter, as he experimented with different genres such as rock, pop, jazz, blues, country, and disco. The album featured songs such as "Man Smart (Woman Smarter)", "One Last Look", "Keep in Touch", and "Spanish Moon". The album received favorable reviews from critics and reached number 68 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


Robert Palmer's Breakthrough Albums: 1980-1985




Robert Palmer's career reached new heights in the early 1980s, when he released some of his most successful and acclaimed albums. In 1980, he released his fourth album Clues, which was influenced by the new wave and synth-pop movements of the time. The album featured songs such as "Looking for Clues", "Johnny and Mary", "Not a Second Time", and "I Dream of Wires". The album also included a cover of Gary Numan's "Cars". The album received rave reviews from critics and reached number 59 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


In 1981, Palmer released his first live album Maybe It's Live, which was recorded during his European tour in support of Clues. The album featured live versions of some of his previous songs, such as "Sneakin' Sally Through the Alley", "Bad Case of Loving You (Doctor, Doctor)", "Some Guys Have All the Luck", and "Every Kinda People". The album also included two new studio tracks: a cover of Bob Dylan's "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight" (with UB40) and an original song called "Maybe It's You". The album received positive reviews from critics and reached number 148 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


In 1983, Palmer released his fifth studio album Pride, which was inspired by his travels to Africa and the Caribbean. The album featured songs such as "Pride", "You Are in My System", "You Can Have It (Take My Heart)", and "Want You More". The album also included a cover of Bob Marley's "Is This Love". The album received mixed reviews from critics and reached number 112 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


In 1985, Palmer released his sixth studio album Riptide, which was his most successful and popular album to date. The album was recorded in Nassau with members of Chic (Bernard Edwards and Tony Thompson) as producers and musicians. The album featured songs such as "Addicted to Love", "I Didn't Mean to Turn You On", "Hyperactive", and "Riptide". The album also included a cover of Cherrelle's "I Didn't Mean to Turn You On". The album received glowing reviews from critics and reached number 8 on the US Billboard 200 chart. It also sold over two million copies in the US alone.


Robert Palmer's Collaborations and Side Projects: 1985-1997




Robert Palmer was not only a successful solo artist, but also a prolific collaborator and a member of several side projects. In 1985, he joined forces with John Taylor and Andy Taylor of Duran Duran and Tony Thompson of Chic to form the supergroup the Power Station. The Power Station released their self-titled debut album in 1985, which featured songs such as "Some Like It Hot", "Get It On (Bang a Gong)", and "Communication". The album received positive reviews from critics and reached number 6 on the US Billboard 200 chart. It also sold over two million copies in the US alone.


In 1986, Palmer collaborated with UB40 on a cover of Bob Dylan's "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight", which was released as a single and reached number 6 on the UK Singles Chart. In 1987, he collaborated with Eric Clapton on a cover of Marvin Gaye's "I Heard It Through the Grapevine", which was released as a single and reached number 31 on the UK Singles Chart. In 1988, he collaborated with Little Feat on a cover of Allen Toussaint's "Sneakin' Sally Through the Alley", which was released as a single and reached number 78 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart.


In 1991, Palmer reunited with the Power Station to record their second album The Power Station Years: The Unreleased Recordings, which featured songs such as "Taxman", "She Can Rock It", and "Love Conquers All". The album was released in 1996, after Palmer had left the group due to creative differences. In 1997, Palmer collaborated with Rod Stewart on a cover of Sam Cooke's "You Send Me", which was released as a single and reached number 23 on the UK Singles Chart.


Robert Palmer's Later Albums: 1998-2003




Robert Palmer's later albums showed his continued interest in exploring different musical genres and influences. In 1998, he released his eleventh studio album Rhythm & Blues, which was influenced by his love for blues music. The album featured songs such as "True Love", "Honeymoon", and "Milk Cow's Calf Blues". The album received mixed reviews from critics and reached number 173 on the US Billboard 200 chart.


In 2001, he released his second live album Live at the Apollo, which was recorded at the Apollo Theater in New York City in December 2001. The album featured live versions of some of his classic songs, such as "Addicted to Love", "Simply Irresistible", "Bad Case of Loving You (Doctor, Doctor)", and "Every Kinda People". The album also included two new studio tracks: a cover of Otis Redding's "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay" and an original song called "TV Dinners". The album received positive reviews from critics but did not chart.


In 2003, he released his twelfth and final studio album Drive, which was influenced by his passion for car racing. The album featured songs such as "Mama Talk to Your Daughter", "29 Ways (To My Baby's Door)", and "Drivin' Wheel". The album received favorable reviews from critics but did not chart.


Robert Palmer's Death and Legacy




Robert Palmer died on 26 September 2003 at the age of 54, following a heart at